Anonymous asked: What's your opinion on Eleanor & Park?

elloellenoh:

Ah, I’ve been wondering when I’d get this question. I admit that I’ve not been very vocal about my feelings on this book because as a fellow author, I don’t feel comfortable speaking negatively about another author’s book. But at the same time I have developed a growing angst over this subject and I will try to put it into words for you. When I first heard of the book, it was through friends who thought I’d be interested in the portrayal of a half-Korean boy. Of course I was! I bought it right away for my daughter. It sounded like a perfect teenage love story. I even recommended it to a friend of mine (non-Korean) who loved it. But then another friend of mine asked me if I had any problems with the depiction of Park and his mother and I hurriedly picked it up before my daughter could read it. Here’s the thing, it IS a lovely little teenage love story. But all I could keep thinking was, Damn it! Why did he have to be Korean? Why did this boy, who is so filled with self-loathing and contempt for his heritage, have to be Korean? Why did his mother with her sing songy broken English have to be Korean?

And because of this, I ended up giving this book away to someone I felt would enjoy it better, a non-Korean. Because I didn’t want my daughter to read this and get that same icky feeling I did. That same humiliating sinking feeling you get when you realize you’ve stumbled across an awful stereotype of a Korean and you cringe that this is all that anyone takes away. And why oh why of all books that could possibly have a diverse main character did it have to be this one that hits the NYT list? Why did Rowell have to include the worst racist comment in the world in this book and think it is okay? Because when Eleanor thinks it, she also at least recognized it was racist. I’m sure that’s why she thought it was ok to include the most racist comment against Asians. But I flinched when I read it. I was so angry when I read it. I hated Eleanor after I read it and I never ever forgave her. No, Asians don’t see things smaller because our eyes are smaller. That is racist. It’s an interesting point to make that you can fall in love with a person of a different culture and still be racist. That’s ultimately Eleanor.

But Park and his mother are more problematic. His mother is described as a chinadoll - a slur in itself. And Park just hates the fact that he doesn’t look more white like his brother. He is filled with self loathing to the point where he even says Asian men are not sexy. SAYS WHO?!! There was a period in my life when I was younger where I pushed away my culture and wished I wasn’t Korean. This was in direct correlation with the amount of racism I endured at the time. So I could understand Park, I could relate to him. But then I FOUND myself! I found my respect and love and pride for my culture. And I recognized just how important my Korean heritage was to me. Park never has that moment of self-discovery. And that is the greatest failure of this book. Because Rowell did not take the opportunity to really understand what it means to be multi-cultural. She wrote a character purely from a white person’s view, never thinking about how a minority person growing up in this country truly feels. The anguish of racism and the complexity of living between two different cultures was never explored. Instead, we are left to believe that Park goes through the rest of his life filled with contempt for his mother’s heritage. A person who wished he was white instead of Asian. And I find myself desperately wishing he’d been white too.

I’ve been seeing many, many pieces on the racism in E&P lately, and I’m very disappointed.

I’m disappointed in myself, because I enjoyed this book and while I may have thought twice about some of the comments made, I didn’t think more than that, and ultimately walked away not recognizing that these were definite, present problems with the the book. I walked away positively gushing about this book, without ever noting the flaws, until months later when I started seeing articles about it.

I won’t say that it’s a bad book because of these issues - it’s a really good story, and I loved the writing, and the personalities of the characters.

I won’t steer anyone away from reading it - I would say to enjoy the story but please, please, PLEASE educate yourself along the way.

ryeisenberg:

joshfrench:

joshfrench:

I want to see Brienne and Jamie do a slapstick Vaudeville show. Am I… am I a fanfic person?

But like their act is just a bunch of terrible “Can I get a hand?” jokes and the big finale is a dancing bear who doesn’t want to cooperate

Think about it

image

(via wilwheaton)

"…torture is not an isolated incident. Rather it is an institution, a practice, a collective endeavor that requires planning and organization. Defenders of torture often defend a widespread practice of purely vicious evil by reference to a single imaginary incident in which it would make sense to torture someone. Imagine, they say, that you knew for certain (as of course you would not) that many people were about to be killed unless a particular person revealed something. Imagine you were certain (as of course you would not be) that you had found that person. Imagine that contrary to accumulated wisdom you believed the best way to elicit the information was through torture, and that you were sure (as of course you would not be) that the information would be revealed, that it would be accurate (nobody EVER lies under torture), and that it would prevent the greater tragedy (and not just delay it or move it), with no horrible side-effects or lasting results. Then, in that impossible scenario, wouldn’t you agree to torture the person?"

Torture Is Mainstream Now (via kenyatta)

(via wilwheaton)

bbcamerica:

Tea time.

bbcamerica:

Tea time.

(Source: jona--than, via wilwheaton)

"You are more than words
and the letters that make them,
you are poetry."

Daily Haiku on Love by Tyler Knott Gregson (via tylerknott)

(via tylerknott)

ransomriggs:

Goinnnn to the bookstore 

and we’re

gonnnnna get maa-aa-aarired 

*whistles*

taherehmafi:

ransom and i got married several months ago in an intimate ceremony, but recently had a larger reception for more family and friends, and it was a blast! as we’re both writers, it seemed fitting to have the event at one of our favorite bookstores: the last bookstore in downtown LA. we’ve had a lot of requests for photos, so i thought i’d drop a few here. hope you enjoy them as much as we do! 

:::for the especially curious:::

my bouquet: was made from the pages of ransom’s novel (miss peregrine’s home for peculiar children).

our photographers: brandon + katrina of brandon wong photography.

venue: the last bookstore in downtown los angeles.

catering: the extremely fabulous heirloomla.

flowers: from floral art!

rentals: furniture from found rentals, dishes from dishwish!

the band: one of our favorite local indie bands, the gallery.

hugs and books!

xx

tahereh

I love these two so much. Or, as much as one can love people one doesn’t know personally. Almost done reading Hollow City!

Sherlock | The Hounds of Baskerville » Scenery

(Source: intobattle, via bbcssherlock)

(Source: benedictsolo, via bbcssherlock)

moriartyspet:

Andrew Scott on the IFTA’s 2014 (x)

His portrayal is one of most delicious villains I’ve encountered in awhile. He is fantastic.

(via bbcssherlock)

onestarbookreview:

“Even if you read this book 500 times, it has always the same plot line.”

You mean… you’ve reread books and the plots changed?? Where are these magical tomes??

onestarbookreview:

Even if you read this book 500 times, it has always the same plot line.”

You mean… you’ve reread books and the plots changed?? Where are these magical tomes??